Started Designing the Mural

We have been working on our mural design since the beginning of February. Based on our discussion, we decided to create a mural that represents our uniqueness, the most international high school in Maryland.

We will paint an anatomical heart in the middle of the mural and all the continents that students are coming from around the heart. The heart and continents are connected with the veins made of LED strips.

The mural will be 8′ x 4′ and installed at the entrance of the school. So, we started working on a big piece of paper to get used to working on a big surface!

Looking Back Fall 2017!

Let’s reflect on what we have done so far.

Our first meeting was at the end of September. At first, we made simple circuits to turn LED lights on. Next, we programmed Arduino to blink LED lights and used photoresistors that change its resistance based on brightness to control these LED lights. We spent a couple of weeks to understand electric thresholds as they are important when creating interactive projects.

We then played with touch sensors. Did you know that many of our everyday objects are conductive and can be used as sensors? Such as DVDs…

Pencils…

Play-Doh!

We also controlled servo motors with joysticks.

And then spelled out our names or some other words we like with seven-segment displays although some characters are hard to make with these displays.

On our final day of the semester, we made holiday cards with LED lights, button batteries, and copper tape. It was fun!

We learned so much these past months. I can’t wait to see what we can do for the interactive mural with these skills!

Nov 20 – Seven-Segment Display

Important announcement:
November 27: We will cancel the club due to the classroom availability.
December 4: Our last day in 2017. We will order pizza and make a holiday card with LED lights that you can bring home!
– We will be back in February 2018. Day of the week may be changed. We will let you know details via email and on this website.

Week 9 files download


What is a Seven-Segment Display?

seven-segment display (SSD), or seven-segment indicator, is a form of electronic display device for displaying decimal numerals that is an alternative to the more complex dot matrix displays.

Seven-segment displays are widely used in digital clocks, electronic meters, basic calculators, and other electronic devices that display numerical information.


Testing the Display


Let’s make sure that the display works properly first. Move around the right side of the red wire and observe what happens.


 

Count Down

  1. Make a circuit as above.
  2. Open the file, 01_Seven_Segment.ino.
  3. Figure out what is happening!
Arduino Pin 7 Segment Pin Connection
2 A
3 B
4 C
5 D
6 E
7 F
8 G
9 DP

Try this!

Can you say HELLO or some other things with this display?


If you want to try to work with
a 4 Digit 7 Segment LED Display


Check this page: Programming 4 Digit 7 Segment LED Display
(https://create.arduino.cc/projecthub/SAnwandter1/programming-4-digit-7-segment-led-display-2d33f8)

Nov 13 – Joystick with Servo Motor by Mayer

Joystick Codes

int led = 13;//built-in LED light in Arduino board
int y = 0;//value from input01 to arduino
int x = 0;//value from input02 to arduino
int input01 = A0;
int input02 = A1;

 

void setup() {
// put your setup code here, to run once:
pinMode(led, OUTPUT);//output pin
Serial.begin(9600);//speed of information transfer from arduino to computer
}

void loop() {
// put your main code here, to run repeatedly:
y = analogRead(input01);//get value from input01
x = analogRead(input02);//get value from inout02

delay(100);//dealy the information transferrring to avoid crush

//print the values with to plot or view
Serial.print(x);
Serial.print(“\t”);
Serial.println(y);
}

Make a circuit shown below

Joystick that controls a Servo Motor Codes

#include <Servo.h>

Servo servo;
int x_key = A1;//input A1
int y_key = A0;//input A0
int x_pos;//value from A1 to arduino
int y_pos;//value from A0 to arduino
int servo_pin = 9;//output pin for our servo motor
int initial_position = 0;//start angle

void setup ( ) {
Serial.begin (9600) ;
servo.attach (servo_pin ) ;
servo.write (initial_position);
pinMode (x_key, INPUT) ;
pinMode (y_key, INPUT) ;
}

void loop ( ) {
delay(500);
x_pos = analogRead (x_key) ;//read from inputs
y_pos = analogRead (y_key) ;

Serial.print(x_pos);//easy to check from the Serial Monitor
Serial.print(“\t”);
Serial.print(y_pos);
Serial.print(“\t”);
Serial.println(initial_position);

 

//if() statements for things to be connected
if (x_pos < 300) {
if (initial_position < 10) { } else {
initial_position = initial_position – 20;
servo.write ( initial_position ) ;
delay (100) ;
}
} if (x_pos > 700) {
if (initial_position > 360)
{
}
else {
initial_position = initial_position + 20;
servo.write ( initial_position ) ;
delay (100) ;
}
}

if (y_pos < 300) {
if (initial_position < 10) { } else {
initial_position = initial_position – 20;
servo.write ( initial_position ) ;
delay (100) ;
}
} if (y_pos > 700) {
if (initial_position > 360)
{
}
else {
initial_position = initial_position + 20;
servo.write ( initial_position ) ;
delay (100) ;
}
}
}

Please Don’t touch the joystick circuit, and add the servo motor directly into the circuit shown below

Oct 30 – Capacitive Touch Sensor

Welcome back! Today, we will make capacitive touch sensors!

Week 6


What’s a capacitive touch sensor?

It can sense the electrical capacitance of the human body. With the capacitiveSensor library, we can turn two or more Arduino pins into a capacitive sensor. All the sensor setup requires is a medium to high value resistor and a piece of wire and a small (to large) piece of aluminum foil on the end. At its most sensitive, the sensor will start to sense a hand or body inches away from the sensor.

Some inspirations




Let’s do this!

    1. You have a library file within your downloaded files. It is named “arduino-libraries-CapacitiveSensor-0.5.1-3-ga07209f.zip.”
    2. Add this file to a new sketch choose: Sketch->Import Library->CapacitiveSensor.

    3. Make your circuit as below.

    4. Open capsense-led.ino. Compile and upload!

Try different resistors

– Use a 1 megohm resistor (or less maybe) for absolute touch to activate.
– With a 10 megohm resistor the sensor will start to respond 4-6 inches away.
– With a 40 megohm resistor the sensor will start to respond 12-24 inches away (dependent on the foil size). Common resistor sizes usually end at 10 megohm so you may have to solder four 10 megohm resistors end to end.

– from Capacitive Sensing Library

Try different materials for a sensor

  • Alminium foil
  • Pencils
  • Fruits
  • Metal cans
  • And more!

Want to learn more?

>> Detailed information: Capacitive Sensing Library

Oct. 23 – Threshold and if-else

We will meet in the computer room, #110. We will explore further how we can use  Arduino with thresholds and if-else conditions.

Week 5 files


Have you done this? – Blink the External LED

  1. Connect the circuit as above.
  2. Open the file: Blink_External_LED.ino
  3. Compile and upload.
  4. Can you change the blinking speed by adjusting the delay number in milliseconds?

Let’s look at what is happening

  1. Input/output
  2. Analog/digital
  3. Variables
  4. If, else (conditions)
  5. Serial monitor, serial plotter

Have you done this? – Control Arduino with threshold

  1. Connect the circuit as above.
  2. Open the file: AnalogInput_threshold.ino.
  3. Compile and upload.
  4. Adjust threshold using serial monitor or serial plotter.

Controlling 2 LEDs with threshold

  1. Connect the circuit as above.
  2. Open the file: AnalogInput_threshold.ino.
  3. Compile and upload.
  4. Adjust threshold using serial monitor or serial plotter.
  5. Change one of the LED to an active buzzer.

Advanced!
Ultra Sonic Sensor


Reading a manual is also an important part of using technologies. So, let’s practice this…

  1. Open Elego_Sensor_Tutorial.pdf and go to Lesson 26 – Ultra Sonic Sensor.
  2. Connect the circuit as above.
  3. Open the file: Ultrasonic_Sensor.ino.
  4. Install the library: Arduino > Sketch > Include Library > Add .zip Library…
  5. Complile and upload.
  6. Check the serial monitor.
  7. Can you add a condition (if-else) using the distance on the serial monitor?

Oct. 16 – Using Threshold

We will meet in the computer room, #110, today. We will learn to control Arduino using a programming language.

>> Click here to download week 4 files.


Review from Week 2 (1): Blink the Default LED

  1. Connect the computer and Arduino.
  2. Download the file here:
    File > Examples > 01. Basics > Blink
  3. Compile and upload.
  4. Can you see that the default LED (at pin 13) is blinking?

Review from Week 2 (2): Blink the External LED

  1. Connect the circuit as above.
  2. Save the previously downloaded file with a new name.
  3. Change the output pin.
  4. Compile and upload.
  5. Can you change the blinking speed by adjusting the delay number in milliseconds?

What’s a threshold?

According to dictionary.com, a threshold is

the point at which a stimulus is of sufficient intensity to begin to produce an effect
e.g. the threshold of consciousness; a low threshold of pain.

We often use a threshold to control Arduino.


Control Arduino with threshold

  1. Connect the circuit as above.
  2. Open the file: AnalogInput_threshold.ino
  3. Compile and upload.

Let’s look at what is happening

  1. Input/output
  2. Analog/digital
  3. Variables
  4. If, else (conditions)
  5. Serial monitor, serial plotter

Now, how do you want to arrange this circuit? You can use more led lights, motor, active buzzer, and more!